Skip to main content
Back

Events

Event Schedule

7:30 – 8:30

Registration & Breakfast

8:30 – 9:15

Opening Remarks
Dr. Joshua Tepper, President & CEO, Health Quality Ontario

9:15 – 10:00

Morning Keynote Speaker

Dr. Danielle Martin

In 2014, Dr. Danielle Martin’s keen insights, wit and deep knowledge of Canada’s health care system brought her international acclaim when a video of her presentation to a United States Senate Subcommittee on health care went viral. Over 1.3 million people from across the globe watched as she challenged assumptions and changed minds about the state of health care in our country.

Dr. Martin will be at Health Quality Transformation 2015 presenting on The Pivot Point: From Pilot to System Solution. Hear insights into why change can be so challenging, what our usual stumbling blocks are and how we can work past them to transform small successes into bigger solutions that enhance the way we deliver care.

10:00 - 10:30

Break / Travel Time

10:30 - 11:45

Morning Breakout Sessions


Ontario’s health care system typically delivers high quality episodes of care. However, international comparisons often highlight the need for Ontario to improve the delivery of integrated care and focus on key patient transition points. In order to address these concerns, several major initiatives are now underway to improve the delivery of integrated care in our province.

This session will discuss the current approach to improving the delivery of integrated care in Ontario. It will highlight the transformations being implemented through Health Link, home care, and primary care reform, the move to new governance models such as health hubs and the introduction of Integrated Funding models, the use of data and Quality Improvement Plans to drive integration, and the increasing emphasis on engaging patients in care design.

Target Audience: Quality improvement leads and specialists, policy advisors, organizational leadership, front line service providers, and patient leads in the home and community, primary care, and acute care sectors

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Gain a thorough understanding of how Ontario currently performs on the delivery of integrated care
  2. Learn about the series of transformations and improvements underway to improve experiences of integrated care

View Speaker Biographies

People need many health care services to help them during the palliative and end-of-life phases of their care. How these services are delivered can affect a person’s quality of life and how they feel about their end-of-life care.

This session will focus on how we can improve care for patients who are near the end of their lives as well as support the people who care for them.

Target Audience: Health care providers, informal caregivers, patients and family members, policy and decision-makers, and health care educators in all sectors of the health system.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Understand patient and family perspectives and the evidence supporting best practices for palliative and end-of-life care
  2. Learn about the current state of end-of-life care in Ontario and how palliative and end-of-life care services in Ontario are currently performing

View Speaker Biographies

Every year, one person in five experiences a mental health or addiction problem. However, mental health and addictions is also an area where both evidence and the ability to measure quality are improving.

This session will address the current state of mental health and addictions care in Ontario and how it can be improved. The discussion will focus on specific initiatives that are making a difference, and how policy change, provincial standards and guidelines for care can facilitate further improvements. It will also consider the delivery of mental health and addictions care from multiple perspectives, including providers, policy experts, patients, and their families.

Target Audience: Health system thought leaders, health care professionals and providers in all sectors of the health system, patients and caregivers.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Explore the current state of mental health and addictions and the strategies being used to improve its delivery in Ontario
  2. Learn about initiatives that have facilitated improved health outcomes and patient experiences with mental health and addictions care

View Speaker Biographies

Evidence has shown that certain groups experience disparities in their health status, access to health services and the quality of health care they receive. In fact, socioeconomic status and environmental challenges all too often affect an individual’s access to appropriate, high-quality care. These disparities, or inequities, in health care delivery not only effect patient experiences and outcomes, but can have a detrimental effect on the health system as a whole.

This session will focus on health equity as a domain of quality and the delivery of equitable care in Ontario. It will discuss the difference between health inequality and inequity, the impact health inequity has in Ontario from the patient, provider and policy-maker perspective, and strategies for overcoming the barriers commonly associated with addressing health equity issues. By attending this session, participants will also have the opportunity to inform the development of Health Quality Ontari

o’s Health Equity Strategic Plan.

Target Audience: Experts and leaders in health equity, housing, social services, quality improvement, performance reporting, evidence-based care, clinicians, health service delivery organizations, LHINs, health links, government, patients, public & caregivers

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Understand the difference between health inequality and inequity and hear from patients what health inequity looks like in practice
  2. Explore efforts to address inequity in Ontario and provide input into the development of HQO’s Health Equity Strategic Plan

View Speaker Biographies

IDEAS (Improving & Driving Excellence Across Sectors) is a comprehensive, province-wide initiative to enhance health system performance by increasing capacity in quality improvement, leadership and change management across all health care sectors. It is delivered through a collaborative partnership between the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME) at the University of Toronto, Health Quality Ontario (HQO) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).

This session will showcase the winning projects from 2014 and highlight lessons learned and the gains that project teams have achieved over the past year.

Target Audience: Anyone sponsoring, leading or participating in a Quality Improvement initiative (leaders, providers, patients) in any sector of the health system.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn about IDEAS Advanced Learning Program projects, innovative ideas for improvement and the application of quality improvement science
  2. Discover how the Alumni Achievement Awards are contributing to the sustainability of quality improvement initiatives across Ontario

View Speaker Biographies

Primary care providers in Ontario are dedicated to delivering the best possible care for their patients. In order to provide effective, evidence-based care, these providers require access to timely and relevant data. Although there are many useful physician-level reports in Ontario, they are often standalone products that do not provide an integrated view of their practice. There is currently an opportunity to align data sources, indicators and comparators and equip providers with the data they need.

This session will discuss the various types of data and reports that are commonly used to inform quality improvement efforts, and address the strengths and weaknesses of different data sources, such as administrative data and electronic medical records. Performance measurement experts will also explore how a better alignment of these reporting products could lead to improved care for patients.

Target Audience: Health care administrators, clinicians, quality improvement professionals, and policy makers in the primary care sector

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn how primary care providers are using various types of data to support their practice and quality improvement efforts
  2. Participate in an open dialogue about the benefits of, as well as barriers to, a more coordinated and aligned approach to physician-level reporting

View Speaker Biographies

Quality Based Procedures (QBPs) are defined as groups of patient services that incent high quality care by offering opportunities for health providers to share best practices and deliver even better quality care. This session will focus on how patient outcomes can be improved through the adoption of the QBP clinical pathways.

In this session, clinical and organizational leaders will discuss the current state of QBP adoption, with a focus on clinical leadership, adoption of tools such as order sets, clinical decision aids and the use of data. The progress of QBPs in different areas of the province will also be shared, highlighting some provincial-level initiatives.

Target Audience: Decision-makers, clinical epidemiologists, evidence experts, quality improvement leads, knowledge and implementation experts, policy leads, care providers in all sectors of the health system.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Develop an understanding of the provincial vision of quality-based improvement
  2. Discover how organizations across the province have approached QBP implementation and used data to drive adoption

View Speaker Biographies

This session, an assembly of the top ranked abstracts submitted to Health Quality Transformation 2015, will feature presentations that demonstrate innovative approaches to quality improvement planning, measurement and the achievement of results over time. It will provide perspectives directly from the field across all sectors.

In Ontario, we have a remarkable quality ecosystem that is evolving. Sharing our experiences is one of the most effective methods for discovering innovative ideas, spreading change, and facilitating the delivery of high quality care.

Target Audience: Individuals from all sectors who are interested in how others are making changes to improve the quality of care they deliver and sustain and spread improvement, in all sectors of the health system.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Discover how health system providers across Ontario have translated knowledge into practice and learn of innovations that have successfully transformed health care delivery and promoted a culture of quality
  2. Engage in stimulating discussions and get ideas and information that may be implemented in any sector of the health system

View Speaker Biographies

The Quality of Care Information Protection Act (QCIPA) was introduced as part of the province’s patient safety agenda and was passed in order to promote the sharing of information and open discussions among health professionals. QCIPA was intended to facilitate the identification and investigation of critical incidents, so that similar incidents can prevented in the future. Some feel that QCIPA is working well, while others have raised concerns that QCIPA is being used to prevent patients and families from being fully informed about what went wrong in a particular incident and what will be done to improve care.

In 2014, the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care established a committee to review current practices in the interpretation and implementation of QCIPA and to make recommendations for improvement. This session will highlight the work of the QCIPA committee, including the learnings that informed their recommendations and the complexities of the issues they grappled with as they debated the balance between accountability, transparency, patient safety, and quality improvement.

Target Audience: Individuals from all sectors who are interested in learning more about balancing safety and accountability and the process of the QCIPA review

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn about the process of the QCIPA review, as well as the findings and recommendations of the review panel
  2. Discuss the balance between accountability and safety and learn about the principles of a ‘just culture’ and how they informed the recommendations of the committee

View Speaker Biographies

Patient relations, a formal process for receiving and responding to the questions and concerns shared by their patients, clients, and residents, has an important role to play in the provision of responsive and high quality care. New provincial regulations highlight the role that patient relations data can play as a source of ideas for quality improvement.

This session will focus on how the patient relations process can be improved in any health care organization and discuss how patients can be equal partners in the process. It will highlight best practices in patient relations for each sector and address common barriers to creating an open patient relations process. During this session, participants will identify how sample patient relations processes can be improved and develop strategies for improvement.

Target Audience: Patient advisors, patient relations specialists, and quality improvement professionals, health care providers interested in patient engagement, patients, families, and caregivers.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn about best practices in patient relations and how to engage patients in the process.
  2. Identify areas of focus and develop strategies for how to improve patient relations processes

View Speaker Biographies

This workshop is designed for individuals who are responsible for creating or updating their organization’s annual Quality Improvement Plan (QIP). It will explore best practices in QIP development and provide tools and resources that will simplify the QIP development process.

The session will feature a short presentation on QIPs, the QIP submission process, and how QIPs can be integrated into daily practice. It will also highlight some key trends and observations from the 2015/16 QIPs. Afterwards, participants will engage in a review of sample QIPs and will receive peer feedback on their own plans. Please note that participants will need access to their organization’s QIP during the workshop, so will need to bring a paper or electronic c

opy.

Target Audience: Quality improvement leads, specialists, and individuals responsible for the creation of organizational QIPs, particularly individuals who are new to the QIP development process.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn about the QIP creation and development process and discover opportunities to integrate QIPs into daily practice and organizational strategic planning processes.
  2. Explore tools and resources that will facilitate the development of effective QIPs.

View Speaker Biographies

Patient and Family Advisory Councils have become an important and integral part of the health care system, working towards transforming health care in Ontario. As hospitals, cancer centers, long term care homes, and other health care organizations start building their respective patient and family advisory communities, there are some essential ‘building blocks’ that are required to ensure these communities are engaged, effective and strong. This workshop will feature discussions that will help participants, no matter where they are in the community “building” process. We will focus in particular on how advisors can balance their personal experiences with the goals and vision of their institution and the direction of the Patient and Family Advisory Council as a whole.

Target Audience: This session is intended for delegates in any sector who are either in the process of building their Patient and Family Advisory Council, or have a Council at various stages of development. This session is beneficial for patient, family members and caregivers who are members of a Patient and Family Advisory Council, or would like to participate in one.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session participants will:

  1. Gain insight into the various techniques used for recruitment, retention, orientation and motivation for new members to participate in the various opportunities available to Patient and Family Advisors in the health system.
  2. Learn ways to set goals, effective meeting planning, and setting of agendas to ensure all Patient and Family Advisors feel engaged and remove any feeling of ‘tokenism’.

Partnering with patients - a good idea to many; to others, just another thing they have to do. In either case, just dropping a patient into a group does not necessarily lead to effective partnership.

So how can the experience and expertise of patient partners contribute to better planning, policies, processes, training and project results?

As an advisor, what is the opportunity for you to partner meaningfully? How do you help align the goals and actions of the organization with what patients' value? And where can you have the most impact?

Our panelists will explore what makes a relationship between health care professionals and advisors successful. Is there more than one way to partner effectively? They will examine how to deal with some of the organizational culture aspects that help or hinder effective relationships. And they will identify practical supports that can make or break partnerships.

Hear about the impact these partnerships are making in different health care organizations at various levels of the health system.

Target Audience:
Roles: Patient and caregiver advisors, senior management, healthcare professionals, patient engagement professionals

Sector(s): All healthcare sectors - all levels

Learning Objectives
By attending this session participants will:

  1. Understand the challenges and discover strategies for partnering productively
  2. Understand there is no one-size-fits-all solution but a range of approaches that fit the different types of partner opportunities

11:45 – 1:00

Lunch Break: Exhibit Hall/Poster viewing or Lunch & Learn Sessions (note that Lunch & Learn sessions require pre-registration)


This session will feature presentations that demonstrate the utilization of innovations and best practices in the provision of equitable care. The discussion will focus on improving access to care, variation related to socioeconomic or geographic differences, as well as improving care for marginalized populations and northern and rural communities.

Target Audience: Individuals interested in equity and quality improvement in primary care, home and community care, hospitals, and long-term care.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn innovative approaches to providing equitable health care and improving care for disadvantaged populations
  2. Discuss key lessons learned and network with others interested in health equity

This session will feature presentations that demonstrate innovative strategies for using data to drive performance improvement. A variety of data sources will be explored and the discussion will focus on how quality improvement in all sectors of the health system can be achieved through effective data collection and analysis.

Target Audience: Clinicians, health care leaders, quality improvement professionals, decision support specialists and data analysts in primary care, home and community care, hospitals, long-term care.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn innovative strategies for using data to guide quality improvement efforts and the impact of these strategies can have on health outcomes
  2. Discuss key lessons learned and network with health care leaders and professionals about using data to facilitate improvement

This session will feature presentations that demonstrate innovative approaches to engaging patients, families, and caregivers in activities to improve care. It will address the design and implementation of patient and family empowerment strategies such as self-management and shared decision making, and discuss the principle of patients as partners.

Target Audience: Individuals with an interest in optimizing patient engagement and experiences in primary care, home and community care, hospitals, and long-term care.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn innovative strategies for engaging patients and approaches to improving patient and family experiences
  2. Discuss key lessons learned and network with others interested in optimizing patient experiences and engagement.

This session will feature presentations that demonstrate how organizations are delivering improved quality of care and outcomes through the implementation of Quality Based Procedures (QBPs). Experts from across the province will share their experiences with introducing QBPs in the acute care sector, and discuss strategies for expanding QBPs to other sectors.

Target Audience: Health care leaders, clinicians and quality improvement professionals in operations from the hospital, home and community care sectors.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session participants will:

  1. Learn strategies for adopting evidence-informed practices through the implementation of QBPs
  2. Discuss lessons learned and network with others who are interested in evidence-informed care and have successfully implemented the clinical pathways of a Quality Based Procedure in their work environment

You’ve done the research, you have the evidence, and you’ve developed a project plan - now what? How do you do you implement and spread your idea across Ontario to improve patient care and increase system efficiency?

Our session sheds light on this challenge by sitting down with alumni of the Adopting Research to Improve Care Program (ARTIC). A joint program of the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) and Health Quality Ontario (HQO), ARTIC is a proven platform and a provincial resource that breaks down barriers to accelerate the spread and adoption of research evidence across the province, thereby improving healthcare quality for Ontarians.

By attending this session, participants will:

  • Learn how the ARTIC Program helps to spread proven research evidence across the Ontario health system to improve patient care
  • Gain insight to the key learnings derived from ARTIC projects past and present

1:00 – 1:45

The Minister’s Medal Honouring Excellence In Health Quality & Safety

1:45 – 2:00

Travel Time

2:00 – 3:15

Afternoon Breakout Sessions

Primary care is a cornerstone of a high-performing health system.

This session will focus on how primary care is evolving in Ontario, highlighting planned transformations and a population-based approach to primary care. It will include a discussion of experience from other jurisdictions and will feature highlights from the Provincial Expert Advisory Panel on primary care.

It will address the development of a framework for primary care quality (Primary Care Performance Measurement Framework) and other key foundations, including the Primary Care Patient Experience Survey, approaches to audit and feedback, and primary care Quality Improvement Plans. It will also discuss the key role of primary care providers in the delivery of integrated care. Session participants will engage in a discussion about Health Quality Ontario’s proposed approach to facilitating quality and practice improvement.

Target Audience: Health system thought leaders, health care professionals and providers in the primary care sector, patients and caregivers

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Be oriented to planned transformations and increased emphasis on quality in primary care
  2. Contribute to a dialogue on approaches to advancing primary care quality and practice improvement

View Speaker Biographies

This session will discuss the formation and work of the Ontario Health Innovation Council and related developments, including the creation of the Office of the Chief Health Innovation Strategist with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

This session will provide an opportunity to discuss the evolving landscape for technology assessment and adoption in Ontario. In addition to a review of the role of Health Quality Ontario in evaluating innovative technologies and making recommendations regarding public funding in Ontario, as well as the role of MaRS EXCITE in supporting evaluations of health technologies that have not yet received regulatory approval, the panel will discuss the work of the Ontario Health Innovation Council and the creation of the Office of the Chief Health Innovation Strategist within the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Panelists will also highlight opportunities related to strategic, value-based procurement and address innovative approaches to adopting ground-breaking health technologies.

Target Audience: Health system administrators, innovators, physicians, industry representatives

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Explore the role technological innovation can play in improving the quality of health care
  2. Better understand the various parties involved in the development, evaluation and uptake of innovative technologies in Ontario

View Speaker Biographies

Home and community care is expanding in Ontario and patients, caregivers, providers and health care experts are working together to transform the way that care is delivered. What needs to change to improve quality of care in a way that matters to patients? What is the future of home and community care? How will we know when we get it right? What will be the impact on patients, providers, and health outcomes? These are a few of the provocative questions that will be discussed in a panel of thought leaders from the home and community care sector.

The session will explore a vision of the future for home and community care, bringing together the perspectives of the Bringing Care Home: Report of the Expert Group on Home & Community Care, the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s Patients First: Action Plan for Health Care, and those of experts in each sector, examining these varying perspectives through the lens of quality improvement.

Target Audiences:Quality improvement leads and specialists, policy advisors, organizational leadership, front line service providers, and patient leads in the home and community, primary care, and acute care sectors.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Understand the current state of home and community care and be able to describe the “burning platform” for transforming home and community care
  2. Explore what home and community care may look like in 2020 with sector thought leaders and learn how we will know when this transformation is successful

View Speaker Biographies

Improving patient safety and quality of care is challenging. More than 10 years after the Canadian Adverse Events Study and the founding of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute, and despite growing knowledge about interventions to improve safety, many organizations are still struggling to demonstrate improved results.

This session will explore the reasons patient safety remains challenging and focus on emerging organizational efforts that foster high reliability, better communication and effective teamwork to ensure safer, high quality care.

Target Audience: Anyone sponsoring, leading or participating in a Quality Improvement initiative (leaders, providers, patients) in all sectors of the health system.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify key factors that have limited the impact of patient safety strategies in many settings
  2. Understand how high reliability, effective communication and teamwork underlie successful strategies to improve patient safety and quality of care

View Speaker Biographies

Quality improvement within an organization is often the result of small gains being sustained over time and thriving in a culture that is able to quickly spread beneficial change.

This session will address how organizations across Ontario have created a culture of quality and fostered innovations that contribute to improved patient outcomes and experiences. It will feature a variety of thought leaders from across the health system, who will share how their respective organizations took steps to engage clinicians in quality initiatives, foster institutional alignment, and other innovative approaches to developing a culture of sustained improvement.

Target Audience: Health system thought leaders, health care professionals and providers, administrators, quality improvement leads in all sectors of the health system.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Gain insight into what leading organizations have done to create and sustain a culture of quality
  2. Learn strategies for developing a culture of quality that focuses on putting patients first

View Speaker Biographies

Measuring patient experiences of care is essential to health care innovation and to helping providers develop an understanding of what is working well and where there may be opportunities for improvement. Ontario is developing a comprehensive approach to measuring and reporting on patient experiences. This overarching strategy will help address measurement gaps and design a patient-centred approach to experience measurement.

In this session, experts and thought leaders will address the current state of patient experience measurement, and articulate a vision for a more coordinated approach to measuring patient experiences in Ontario.

Target Audience: Health system administrators, Quality Directors, measurement and reporting specialists, health care professionals and providers in all sectors of the health system, patients and caregivers

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Learn about patient experience measurement work currently underway in Ontario and discover opportunities to improve measurement
  2. Help shape the patient experience measurement strategy for Ontario, which will ultimately enhance the delivery of patient-centred care

View Speaker Biographies

Transparency and access to high quality data can lead to improved health care and health outcomes. Other jurisdictions, including the United Kingdom, have embraced open health information and are widely regarded as leaders in quality care.

This session will explore the current status of transparency in public reporting and its impact on providers, health system performance and patient outcomes. It will also address the difference between data for performance measurement and data for improvement, and highlight the steps Health Quality Ontario is taking to provide easy access to high quality data. A dynamic panel discussion will provide cross-sectorial patient and provider perspectives on the value on transparency and public reporting and provide insights into the way health information is being used by different organizations and stakeholder groups.

Target Audience: Individuals from all sectors who are interested in transparency in public reporting and performance in all sectors of the health system.

Learning Objectives
By attending this breakout session, participants will:

  1. Understand the current state of transparency in public reporting, as well as current activities at provincial and local levels to drive improvement in transparency and quality of care
  2. Engage in discussions and contribute to enhanced understanding of this emerging issue

View Speaker Biographies

This session, an assembly of the top ranked abstracts submitted to Health Quality Transformation 2015, will feature presentations that demonstrate innovative approaches to quality improvement planning, measurement and the achievement of results over time. It will provide perspectives directly from the field across all sectors.

In Ontario, we have a remarkable quality ecosystem that is evolving. Sharing our experiences is one of the most effective methods for discovering innovative ideas, spreading change, and facilitating the delivery of high quality care.

Target Audience: Individuals from all sectors who are interested in how others are making changes to improve the quality of care they deliver and sustain and spread improvement.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Discover how health system providers across Ontario have translated knowledge into practice and learn of innovations that have successfully transformed health care delivery and promoted a culture of quality
  2. Engage in stimulating discussions and get ideas and information that may be implemented in any sector of the health system

View Speaker Biographies

Research has demonstrated that positive patient experiences can lead to improved health outcomes, as well as improved patient satisfaction and safety. Measuring patient experiences regularly can help providers develop a deeper understanding of their patients’ experiences of care, identify what is working well and where there may be room for improvement.

This workshop will feature a short presentation on the Primary Care Patient Experience Survey, followed by an exploration of patient experience measurement and best practices for using data to improve care. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss how to test and apply these ideas for improvement in their own settings.

Target Audience: Primary health care professionals and providers, health system administrators, Ministry staff and policy advisors, patients, families, caregivers.

Learning Objectives
By attending this workshop, participants will:

  1. Explore the guiding principles and practices in patient experience measurement.
  2. Learn how to leverage data to inform care and discover practical and innovative ideas for improvement.

View Speaker Biographies

This session will explore how Quality Improvement Plans (QIPs) and QIP integration indicators can be used to foster effective cross-sector relationships and facilitate the delivery of improved, patient-centred care. Participants will learn about the power of these indictors to facilitate improved health outcomes, learn innovative best practices and cross-sectorial change ideas from their peers, and explore solutions to common issues in cross-sectorial quality improvement. Following a brief presentation, participants will discuss and develop cross-sectorial elements for QIPs that will be applicable within their respective organizations. Organizations interested in collaborating on quality initiatives are encouraged to participate in this session

Target Audience: Quality improvement leads and specialists, policy advisors, organizational leadership, front line service providers, patient leads.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Explore the integration indicators within QIPs and learn more about each sector’s role in providing collaborative care
  2. Discover best practices, innovative change ideas, and explore solutions to common issues in cross-sectorial quality improvement

View Speaker Biographies

Ontario’s community Health Links provide coordinated, efficient and effective care to patients with complex needs. This workshop will explore techniques for improving care coordination across Health Links and will address common barriers to coordinated care delivery.

Workshop participants will develop the skills necessary to accelerate care coordination within Health Links and learn systematic approaches to identifying patients who would benefit from cross-sectorial care coordination. Ontario-based experts will also share their strategies for optimizing care coordination and discuss the importance of care coordination conferences that engage providers in all sectors.

Target Audience: Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) and Health Link leaders and participants; cross-sectorial team members; policy makers; patients, families and caregivers

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Discover how to improve care coordination practices within community Health Links and explore techniques for identifying patients who would benefit from cross-sectorial care coordination.
  2. Learn how to engage care providers in all sectors of the health system in care coordination

View Speaker Biographies

We are in an era of health care where clinical and policy decisions increasingly are grounded in data and evidence. This is seen as a positive shift. Often times though it is felt that policy makers and managers of the health care system are far removed from the realities of giving and receiving care, and so rarely see the human consequences – both good and bad – of their decisions. The people who use our health care system, and those who provide the care, have profound and powerful stories to tell about their experiences that can help to inform how we might improve quality or make choices on key decisions like access to services and new technologies.

This session will focus on some important questions about these ‘stories’- “What makes a good patient or provider story?” Where do stories fit with the data and evidence that we use to guide decisions?” “When are stories dangerous or misleading?” “How do we use them?

This session is designed for those contemplating how to resolve the perceived tension between the Evidence Based Movement and Patient Engagement movement. It will offer a provocative discussion of how we can challenge ourselves to incorporate the best that both can bring to delivering high quality care.

Target Audience: Health care professionals, health system thought leaders, patients and caregivers, policy makers, media and providers in all sectors of the health system

Learning Objectives
By attending this session, participants will:

  1. Discuss and hear perspectives on what makes a good patient story and why stories may be important to improving the quality of care
  2. Learn how to bridge the perceived tension between evidence based and patient engagement approaches to improving and delivering high quality care.

Stories have the power to connect people in a deep and meaningful way. In a health care setting, a well told story can improve the quality of care you or a loved one receive, and can impact the health system for the better - in ways data, research or technology never could.

In this session, participants will hear from Patient and Family Advisors about their journeys in the health care system. Discussion will focus on how to effectively turn narratives into real improvement. Moreover, participants will examine effective story telling methods and approaches tor listening to stories to ensure that patient voices are accurately heard and reflected in health projects and programs.

Target Audience: This session is intended for all delegates in any sector wanting to know more about the experiences of Patient and Family Advisors, and the impact their stories can have on our health system.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session participants will:

  1. Hear real experiences to help make the involvement of patient and family advisors more effective.
  2. Better understand ways to tell an effective story and how to implement lessons learned.

Although more than 50 percent of North American hospitals have Patient and Family Advisors, metrics can provide the tipping point for increased adoption, and solidify Patient and Family Advisors as valuable voices within the health care system.

One of the most important factors in the success of projects involving Patient and Family Advisors is using metrics to demonstrate impact (economic, safety, operations, patient experience, etc.)

This session will outline measurement techniques that Patient and Family Advisors can use, explain how to implement a project with metrics, effectively use them to ground results, and will highlight case studies of successful projects that used metrics.

Every Patient and Family Advisor is at risk of marginalization unless they can show the value of patient and family engagement. Great strides have been made in engagement, now it’s time to prove the value with important and needed metrics.

Target Audience:
Roles: Patient and Family Advisors, members and leaders of Patient and Family Advisory Councils, hospital staff coordinators, CEO's, CFO's, Chief Experience Officers (CXO), patient engagement staff, policy researchers and quality improvement leads.

Sector(s): All sectors can benefit from understanding measurement tools used by Patient and Family Advisors. Institutional, care delivery organizations and policy makers.

Learning Objectives
By attending this session participants will:

  1. Understand how to structure a project with appropriate measurements.
  2. Learn measurement techniques for Patient and Family Advisors.

3:15 – 3:30

Break / Travel Time

3:30 – 4:00

Judith John

Judith John’s career spans all aspects of communications, marketing and public affairs, with an extensive background in arts, culture, not-for-profit, health and social services.

Ms. John is active within the health care sector, having served as Vice President of Communications and Public Affairs at the Hospital for Sick Children and as Vice President of Communications and Marketing at Mount Sinai Hospital and Foundation. She also volunteers with Toronto Western Hospital, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network and Mount Sinai, concentrating on the patient experience, partnerships and communications.

A patient advisor for UHN’s Partners in Care program, Ms. John is a trained Patient Partner. She is part of the Province of Ontario’s Phoenix Project on education and patient care, and works with Patients Canada. She was on the 20th anniversary awards selection committee for The Change Foundation regarding initiatives around patient and family-centred care. She also volunteers with Health Quality Ontario, and is currently working on government relations for the Council of Academic Hospitals Ontario.

Ms. John has extensive community experience, having served as Vice-President, Marketing and Communications, at United Way of Greater Toronto. She also regularly acts as a writer and communications / marketing consultant, executive coach and facilitator. As a public relations, communications, ethics and marketing instructor and lecturer, she has taught at universities and colleges across Ontario and has been a guest speaker for institutions worldwide, including England’s National Health Service.

Other community affiliations include the Public Affairs Advisory Committee for the Ontario Trillium Foundation and the Marketing Advisory Board for the Rotman School of Management. She is also on the Advisory Board for the newly created Ryerson City Building Institute, as well as The V Generation, an organization promoting meaningful volunteerism for retirees and senior citizens.

4:00 – 4:45

Afternoon Keynote Speaker

André Picard, Award Winning National Public Health Writer

Patient-Centered Care: What Does It Really Mean?

The promise of “patient-centered care” has become ubiquitous. But what does mean it mean – and look like - to patients and their families? A veteran journalist examines the rhetoric, the reality, and the practical changes needed to make healthcare delivery more patient-centered.

4:45 – 5:00

Closing Remarks

Dr. Andreas Laupacis

Let’s make our health system healthier

Join Our Patient, Family and Public Advisors Program

Patients, families and the public are central to improving health quality.


Claude Lurette and Kowsiya Vijayartnam, Health Quality Ontario Patient, Family and Caregiver Advisors Council Co-Chairs

Sign up for our newsletter

Are you passionate about quality health care for all Ontarians? Stay in-the-know about our newest programs, reports and news.

Health Quality Connect - Health Quality Ontario's newsletter - on an iPad and a cell phone