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Time

QIPSF Agenda

8:15am – 8:45am

Registration

8:45am – 9:00am

Welcome:

Lee Fairclough, BSc, MRT, MHSc
Vice President Quality Improvement,
Health Quality Ontario

and

Joshua Tepper, MD
President & CEO
Health Quality Ontario

9:00am – 10:15am

Bryan Sexton, PhD
Associate Professor, Director
Duke Patient Safety Center, Duke University Health System

If you, your staff, or your colleagues are feeling particularly spent, it is probably because the level of emotional exhaustion in healthcare workers is at an all-time-high. Learn about the Duke Resilience Program, where you can gain knowledge about tools, tactics and research on how to enhance resilience for individuals and in work settings.


Objectives

  1. Identify the impact of stress, fatigue and burnout on care providers and the relationship of burnout with clinical errors and quality of patient care.

  2. Review the newest and most robust research on healthcare worker burnout/engagement and their association with care quality.

10:15am – 10:45am

Break

10:45am – 12:15pm

Morning Breakout Sessions

12:15pm – 1:00pm

Networking Lunch

1:00pm – 1:45pm

Poster Viewing

1:45pm – 3:15pm

Afternoon Breakout Sessions

3:15pm – 3:30pm

Refreshments

3:30pm – 3:45pm

Poster Awards

3:45pm – 4:00pm

Remarks:

Nancy Naylor
Associate Deputy Minister
Ministry of Health & Long-Term Care

4:00pm – 4:45pm

Presenters:
Tara Kiran, MD, CCFP, MSc

Family Physician and Quality Improvement Director and Chair of the Board of Directors
St. Michael’s Hospital Academic Family Health

Kaveh Shojania, MD
Director, C-QuIPS, Professor of Medicine and Vice-Chair
Quality & Innovation, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto

The breadth of fields relevant to patient safety and quality improvement and the wide range of sources in which new research appears can make it difficult to keep abreast of important developments. This plenary presents important new research published in the past year on major topics in these fields. The presenters will address how the evidence-based QI and patient safety interventions and effective strategies identified in these papers can be translated into practice.


Objectives
By the end of this plenary session, the attendees will be able to:

  1. Describe the body of evidence as relates to specific interventions to improve quality and safety

  2. Recognize where the QI and patient safety movement is headed and the new issues that will emerge

  3. Identify new strategies that can be applied to their own practice

4:45pm – 5:00pm

Closing Remarks:

Michael Schull, MSc, MD, FRCPC
President and CEO
The Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES)

Please note the agenda is subject to change


Moderator: Alice Strachan
Specialist Quality Improvement
IDEAS, Health Quality Ontario

Presenter: Christopher Hayes, MD, MSc, MEd
Chief Medical Information Officer
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton


There is growing attention on the need to include the wellbeing of the healthcare workforce as an independent goal (Quadruple Aim: addressing provider wellbeing alongside improving patient experience, population health, and reducing per capita spending on health care) or as an enabler to achieving health system improvement in quality. Recent frameworks have been developed by organizations such as the Institute for Healthcare Improvement that aim in achieving Joy in Work and the Quadruple Aim. This session will discuss the intersection between quality improvement and Joy in Work and introduce strategies to use quality improvement to maintain or augment provider wellbeing.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the intersection between quality improvement and joy in work

  2. Identify factors that drive Joy in Work

  3. Explore how to use strategies to drive Joy in Work in your QI initiatives


Target Audience

  • Quality improvement professionals and trainees

  • Clinical and operational managers

  • All levels of experience

Moderator: Shawna Cunningham
Quality Improvement Advisor
Health Quality Ontario

Presenter: Olivia Ostrow, MD, FAAP
Staff Physician and Patient Safety Lead for the Division of Paediatric Emergency Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children


Tired of hearing about PDSA cycles but not actually being sure what they look like in practice? This interactive session will use examples from a real quality improvement project to practise authentic PDSA application and better appreciate the benefits of doing so. By the end of the sessions, participants will master the key steps in performing PDSA and be able to perform self-assessment regarding authenticity of their PDSA cycles.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Appreciate and describe the role of PDSA as an experimental study tool

  2. Take iterative approach to learning, developing and implementing a change in your organization

  3. Perform self-assessment regarding authenticity of your PDSA work


Target Audience

  • Front-line quality improvers

  • Anyone with Quality Improvement background looking to hone their skills

* Morning only
Moderator: Lisha Lo
Acting Program Manager
University of Toronto Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (C-QuIPS), Hospital for Sick Children

Presenter: Laura MacIagan, MSc
Quality Improvement Epidemiologist
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Layla Mofid, PhD
Quality Improvement Epidemiologist
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences


Data is central to any quality improvement (QI) project, but sometimes people struggle to understand what to measure and how to collect data (sample size, frequency, and variable definitions). This workshop will describe the three types of measures used in quality improvement (outcome, process, and balancing), as well as the different types of data used to construct these measures (i.e., continuous, classification, and count). We will also discuss considerations for data collection, including sample size (how much data to collect), subgrouping (how frequently data is collected), and stratification. Concepts will be illustrated using examples, and participants will learn how to construct a run chart.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe process, outcome, and balancing measures

  2. Identify the different types of data used in QI

  3. Explain how to use and collect data to support quality improvement decisions

  4. Demonstrate how to construct and interpret a run chart to track measures over time


Target Audience

  • Level of expertise - beginner

  • Healthcare professionals who are considering leading a QI project and are uncertain about how to plan their data collection

  • Executive sponsors who are interested in learning more about data in order to support their teams and interpret data

QI landscape in Ontario: Innovative approaches from clinical leaders

*Please note: The afternoon session of the same name builds on this morning session

Moderator: Lee Fairclough, MHSc,
Vice President, Quality Improvement, Health Quality Ontario

Speakers: Jennifer Everson, BScN, MD, CCFP, FCFP
Vice President Clinical, and Primary Care Physician LHIN Lead
Health Quality Ontario Clinical Quality Lead

Cathy Faulds, MD, CCFP, FCFP, CAC (PC), ABPHM
Family Physician and Practising in Palliative Care, Chief Clinical Lead, South West Local Health Integration Network (LHIN)

Ahmed Jakda, MD, MBA Candidate (2018), CFPC (PC),
Provincial Clinical Co-Lead, Ontario Palliative Care Network, Medical Director, Palliative Care, Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Associate Professor, McMaster University, University of Western Ontario, Cancer Care Ontario

Betty-Lou Kristy, Peer Support Substance Use & Provincial Systems Lead, TEACH: Teach Empower Advocate Community Health- a peer initiative of Support & Housing-Halton

Rebecca Van Iersel, Health Quality Ontario


“High-performing health care organizations do not leave quality improvement to chance. They do not expect their leaders to do the heavy lifting alone, nor do they see quality improvement as a discretionary activity. Instead, they take a systematic approach to building the capability and capacity for continual improvement in all areas. They know that such investment will pay off in truly scaling up the quality improvement activities already underway.” Quality Matters; Realizing Excellent Care for All, 2017.

The two breakout sessions will highlight examples from those leading change in the context of the Patients First Act and showcase the leadership skills needed to enable clinician leaders to successfully lead change and drive quality. In both breakout sessions, hear from system leaders on their innovative approaches, their successes and what challenges lay ahead for those leading change.

During the morning session the audience will hear from, and engage in, a fireside chat with clinical leaders from across the province about their involvement in the provincial and regional plans for quality. Examples will include a focus on persistent and resilient efforts that have contributed to the aspects of a culture of quality and embedding quality in everything that we do. “How do we seize the opportunities to learn from pockets of excellence and scale up our efforts to build an enduring culture of quality?” Quality Matters; Realizing Excellent Care for All, 2017.


Objectives

By the end of the two breakout sessions, participants will be able to:

  1. To learn how regional, local and provincial approaches to quality are connected and advanced.

  2. To identify critical skills to enable system change through leadership.

  3. Be inspired to lead quality and join the quality movement.


Target Audience:

  • Clinicians & Administrators leading change

  • Leaders at any level; organizational, sub-regional, regional and provincial

Moderator: Joe Mauti
Quality Improvement Specialist
Health Quality Ontario

Presenter: Wanrudee Isaranuwatchai, PhD
Director and Health Economist
Centre of Excellence for Economic Analysis Research (CLEAR), St. Michael’s Hospital


‘Does it work?’ is a leading question people often ask when evaluating a new health program or initiative. In addition to this question, knowing whether or not the initiative has good ‘value for money’ is becoming another important question to answer and could be helpful especially given the limited resources in health care. Economic evaluation is a technique which could create evidence on the initiative's value for money to assist health professionals and decision-makers in their decision-making process.

This interactive session will provide an overview of economic evaluation including practical examples of how this technique could be applied in the real world setting. At the end of this session, participants will have better understanding of economic evaluation methods, when these methods may be helpful, general elements in the methods to consider, possible required data, and the potential outcomes.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe what economic evaluation is and when this method may be helpful

  2. Choose different approaches to examine the value for money of a health initiative

  3. Identify what information/data you need to conduct an economic evaluation (i.e., general elements in the methods to consider)


Target Audience

  • Level of expertise: Beginner

  • Anyone interested in how to create economic evidence to support their quality improvement initiative

Morning only
Moderator: Tanya Agnihorti
Project Manager, Infection Prevention & Control
and C-QuIPS Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

Presenter: Bryan Sexton, PhD
Associate Professor, Director
Duke Patient Safety Center, Duke University Health System

Enhancing resilience through the Bite-Sized Resilience Series at Duke is about refilling the largely depleted buckets of our emotional, spiritual, cognitive and physical reserves.


Quality improvement efforts frequently ignore the need to make sure that health care workers are ready for the next big initiative, and rarely do they first build up the resilience of staff before expecting even higher levels of quality and safety to be delivered. For some, jumping into innovation is a reasonable first step. But for many individuals and work units, there needs to be a focus on the workers, and their needs, to build capacity and bounce back from burnout, before providing the training and the tools to improve quality in a sustainable way. The Bite-Sized Resilience Series is a special offering by the Duke Patient Safety Center. We designed it to meet the needs of our patient safety and quality improvement communities.


Objectives

  1. Review the newest and most robust research on healthcare worker burnout/engagement and their association with care quality.

  2. Facilitate resilience building for themselves and for their colleagues through the use of simple, brief, evidence-based interventions (live demonstration/experiential learning) that enhance resilience through the cultivation of gratitude, the cultivation of positivity (noticing the good), and the cultivation of three good things.


Target Audience

  • Clinicians of all specialties

  • Nurses

  • Physicians

  • Caregivers in formal or informal leadership roles

  • Counselors

  • Other healthcare professionals

* Morning only
Moderator: Maria Krahn
Specialist Clinical Improvement and Informatics, Health Quality Ontario

Presenter: Jeremy Theal, MD, FRCPC
Chief Medical Information Officer
North York General Hospital

Jennifer Quaglietta, BASc, MBA, CHE, PMP, LSSGB
Director, Patient Experience, Quality, Patient and Family-Centred Care
North York General Hospital


According to the Quality Matters Framework, one of the key enablers of a high quality health care system is to ensure technology works for all. To this end, clinical information systems represent a critical asset to support a culture of continuous quality improvement within health care organizations. This interactive group-learning session will begin with an exploration of key concepts and lessons learned from North York General Hospital’s journey to improve patient outcomes through the eCare project. This is a multi-year hospital wide clinical transformation project utilizing health information technology to support safer, higher quality patient care. Participants will have the opportunity in small groups to apply the concepts discussed to a case study, mimicking how to effectively work in a multi-disciplinary team to advance organizational quality improvement goals, leveraging clinical information systems.


Objectives

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Apply a multi-faceted approach to better leverage clinical information systems to advance quality improvement goals within your organization

  2. Differentiate between technology-focussed projects and clinical transformation projects

  3. Describe when and how to work with your informatics team and other important actors throughout the lifecycle of a quality improvement project

  4. Learn about the impact of clinical standardization enabled by technology to transform the delivery of quality care

Target Audience

  • Level of Expertise: Beginner/Intermediate (no prior knowledge of informatics is required)

  • Clinicians, health care leaders, quality improvement professionals, informatics professionals, change management specialists

* Morning only
Moderator: Gillian Ritcey
Director
IDEAS (Improving & Driving Excellence Across Sectors) Institute of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation, University of Toronto

Presenters: Onil Bhattacharyya, MD, PhD
Associate Professor
Family & Community Medicine, University of Toronto

Payal Agarwal, BASc, MD, CFPC
Family Physician
Women’s College Hospital


The session aims to give those developing new health services tools to manage uncertainty and find a fit between a proposed program and a public need. The session will start with an overview of the different methodologies that can be used in health service design including design thinking, lean start up, the model for improvement, and knowledge translation. We will then discuss why failure should be expected in design of new health services and propose strategies for managing this risk. Group activities will help attendees practice large iterations or “pivots”- changing the intervention, target group or the outcome- to ultimately build a service that meets user needs and achieves meaningful scale.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Contrast the origins, purpose, strengths and uses for different methodologies for health service development.

  2. Describe why health service design is inherently risky, and have tools to help manage that risk.

  3. Identify early signals when creating a new health service and propose iterative changes to find fit between a program and public need.

Target Audience

  • Clinicians working in to create new health services in their local environment

  • Health service researchers

  • Health care policy makers

  • Funders of health service research and evaluation

* Morning only
Presenter: Kaveh Shojania, MD
Director, C-QuIPS
Editor-in-chief, BMJ Quality & Safety


This session will provide an overview of the key considerations and common pitfalls associated with academic writing. Often the key challenge is figuring out what the ‘hook’ is – this will be discussed as well during this session.


Objectives
By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe successful approaches to writing up their QI projects for scholarly publication

  2. Identify target journals that are well suited for scholarly publication of their QI projects

  3. Determine how to place the appropriate emphasis on their QI reporting to maximize likelihood of successful publication of their QI project


Target Audience

  • Academic clinicians

  • Graduate students and clinical trainees who are leading scholarly QI work and are interested in disseminating their results by publishing them in a peer-reviewed journal

  • Individuals seeking to write abstracts more effectively to submit to conferences for presentation


Moderator: Alice Strachan
Specialist Quality Improvement
IDEAS, Health Quality Ontario

Presenter: Christopher Hayes, MD, MSc, MEd
Chief Medical Information Officer
St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton


There is growing attention on the need to include the wellbeing of the healthcare workforce as an independent goal (Quadruple Aim: addressing provider wellbeing alongside improving patient experience, population health, and reducing per capita spending on health care) or as an enabler to achieving health system improvement in quality. Recent frameworks have been developed by organizations such as the Institute for Healthcare Improvement that aim in achieving Joy in Work and the Quadruple Aim. This session will discuss the intersection between quality improvement and Joy in Work and introduce strategies to use quality improvement to maintain or augment provider wellbeing.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the intersection between quality improvement and joy in work

  2. Identify factors that drive Joy in Work

  3. Explore how to use strategies to drive Joy in Work in your QI initiatives


Target Audience

  • Quality improvement professionals and trainees

  • Clinical and operational managers

  • All levels of experience

Moderator: Shawna Cunningham
Quality Improvement Advisor
Health Quality Ontario

Presenter: Olivia Ostrow, MD, FAAP
Staff Physician and Patient Safety Lead for the Division of Paediatric Emergency Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children


Tired of hearing about PDSA cycles but not actually being sure what they look like in practice? This interactive session will use examples from a real quality improvement project to practise authentic PDSA application and better appreciate the benefits of doing so. By the end of the sessions, participants will master the key steps in performing PDSA and be able to perform self-assessment regarding authenticity of their PDSA cycles.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Appreciate and describe the role of PDSA as an experimental study tool

  2. Take iterative approach to learning, developing and implementing a change in your organization

  3. Perform self-assessment regarding authenticity of your PDSA work


Target Audience

  • Front-line quality improvers

  • Anyone with Quality Improvement background looking to hone their skills

*Afternoon only
Moderator: Lisha Lo
Acting Program Manager
University of Toronto Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (C-QuIPS), Hospital for Sick Children

Presenter: Laura Maclagan, MSc
Quality Improvement Epidemiologist
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences

Layla Mofid, PhD
Quality Improvement Epidemiologist
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences


The workshop will cover the lifetime of a Statistical Process Control (SPC) chart, from collecting baseline data, to learning from Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycles, to monitoring and ensuring that improvements are sustained. Participants will learn how to create SPC charts using QI Macros software via live demonstrations and through the analysis of case studies.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Select the correct type of SPC chart

  2. Interpret SPC charts to learn from data for quality improvement

  3. Create an SPC chart using QI Macros software

  4. Describe the process of learning from data over the lifetime of a QI project – from collecting baseline data, to implementing tests of change, through to sustaining improvements.


Target Audience

  • Individuals working in quality improvement (QI) who are interested in moving beyond run charts and want to learn about SPC charts.

  • Executive sponsors who want to learn about a more powerful tool for learning from data – an SPC chart.

Note: Participants should bring a laptop with QI Macros software installed to the session (link will be provided in advance). Pre-reading to prepare participants for topics to be covered in the session will be provided.

Clinician leadership: Building capacity to lead change

Moderator: Jeffrey Turnbull, MD, FRCPC,
Chief, Clinical Quality, Health Quality Ontario

Speakers: Ross Baker, PhD,
Professor and Program Lead,
Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto

David Kaplan, MD, MSc, CCFP,
Primary Care Lead, HQO, Associate Professor,
Family & Community Medicine and Joint Centre for Bioethics at the University of Toronto

Martin Lees, MD, MSA, PhD, CPHQ,
Primary Care and Clinical Quality Lead,
ESC LHIN/HQO

Tamara Wallington, MD, FRCPC,
Clinical Quality Lead
Central West Local Health Integration Network


The afternoon session will build on the morning insights to take a deeper look at what leadership skills are required to create and sustain system level change. Table discussions will allow for sharing examples of successful leadership strategies that ultimately broke down barriers to change.


Objectives:

By the end of the two breakout sessions, participants will be able to:

  1. To learn how regional, local and provincial approaches to quality are connected and advanced.

  2. To identify critical skills to enable system change through leadership.

  3. Be inspired to lead quality and join the quality movement.


Target Audience:

  • Clinicians & Administrators leading change

  • Leaders at any level; organizational, sub-regional, regional and provincial

Moderator: Joe Mauti
Quality Improvement Specialist
Health Quality Ontario

Presenter: Wanrudee Isaranuwatchai, PhD
Director and Health Economist
Centre of Excellence for Economic Analysis Research (CLEAR), St. Michael’s Hospital


‘Does it work?’ is a leading question people often ask when evaluating a new health program or initiative. In addition to this question, knowing whether or not the initiative has good ‘value for money’ is becoming another important question to answer and could be helpful especially given the limited resources in health care. Economic evaluation is a technique which could create evidence on the initiative's value for money to assist health professionals and decision-makers in their decision-making process.

This interactive session will provide an overview of economic evaluation including practical examples of how this technique could be applied in the real world setting. At the end of this session, participants will have better understanding of economic evaluation methods, when these methods may be helpful, general elements in the methods to consider, possible required data, and the potential outcomes.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe what economic evaluation is and when this method may be helpful

  2. Choose different approaches to examine the value for money of a health initiative

  3. Identify what information/data you need to conduct an economic evaluation (i.e., general elements in the methods to consider)


Target Audience
By attending this session, participants will:

  • Level of expertise: Beginner

  • Anyone interested in how to create economic evidence to support their quality improvement initiative

*Afternoon only
Moderator: Gillian Ritcey
Director
IDEAS (Improving & Driving Excellence Across Sectors) Institute of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation, University of Toronto

Presenter: Melanie Barwick, PhD, CPsych
Senior Scientist, Research Unit, Associate Professor,
Psychiatry/Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto


This workshop will focus on the ‘how to’ of sharing and implementing best practices by presenting an overview of fundamental considerations of knowledge translation (KT) and implementation. Built in questions for reflective inquiry will help participants to consider what this content means from their own perspective. The aim to improve your knowledge on these issues, and to contemplate concrete next steps of your own choosing.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe knowledge translation and implementation, and understand the differences between these two concepts

  2. Describe the basic components of KT planning

  3. Describe the fundamental considerations for implementation of evidence


Target Audience

  • Researchers

  • Decision Maker

  • Communications

  • KT professionals

*Afternoon only
Moderator: Joanne Goldman, PhD
Research Education Lead, C-QuIPS
Post-Doctoral Fellow, The Wilson Centre, University Health Network

Brian Wong, MD, FRCPC
Associate Director, C-QuIPS
Editorial Board Member, Academic Medicine

Cynthia Majewski
Lead - Foundations of Quality Improvement
Improving & Driving Excellence Across Sectors (IDEAS), IHPME

Speakers: To be announced


This session is a moderated poster walkabout of six “Top Abstracts” quality improvement and patient safety oral presentations. These abstracts will be chosen from the poster abstract submissions. Groups of no more than 10 people with a faculty will go from poster to poster to learn about the projects from poster presenters. Each moderated presenter will have 10 minutes to present followed by 5 minutes of questions and discussion.


Objectives
By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss current quality improvement and patient safety projects and findings

  2. Learn about new quality improvement and patient safety initiatives that can be applied to one’s own workplace settings


Target Audience

  • Quality improvement and patient safety specialists

  • Healthcare researchers 

  • Front line service providers

  • Organizational leadership

Canadian College of Health Leaders logoThe College of Family Physicians of Canada logo


Maintenance of Certification

Attendance at this program entitles certified Canadian College of Health Leaders members (CHE / Fellow) up to 2.5 Category II credits towards their maintenance of certification requirement.

Let’s make our health system healthier

Join Our Patient, Family and Public Advisors Program

Patients, families and the public are central to improving health quality.


Claude Lurette and Kowsiya Vijayartnam, Health Quality Ontario Patient, Family and Caregiver Advisors Council Co-Chairs

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