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Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Forum 2018: Agenda

As of April 30, subject to change


Time

Agenda

8:15 a.m.

Registration Opens

8:45 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks

9:00 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.

Morning Plenary Session:

Truths, Myths and Metaphors: Challenging our Thinking About Team Competence
Keynote by Lorelei Lingard, Professor and Director, Centre for Education Research & Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University

10:15 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

Break: Networking and Refreshments (Travel Time)

10:45 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Morning Breakout Sessions

12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Networking Lunch

1:00 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.

Poster Viewing

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Afternoon Breakout Sessions

3:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Break: Networking and Refreshments (Travel Time)

3:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

Poster Awards Presentation

3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

Afternoon Plenary Session:

Finally, Connecting the Dots and Making it Work
Keynote by Dr. Jeffrey Braithwaite, Foundation Director of the Australian Institute of Health Innovation

4:45 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Closing Remarks


Advice abounds for scholars hoping to publish their work: Writers should articulate a clear question and purpose; position the work theoretically; report the methods accurately; avoid over-interpretation; acknowledge limitations. Though these tips are accurate, they're also insufficient. What really separates a mediocre paper from a great one is something much more essential. A mediocre paper reports a study, but a great paper tells a story. This workshop will teach participants how to tell a story in their scholarly paper. Particular attention will be paid to creating an Introduction that focuses the reader’s attention on a problem that matters, and then developing this story in the Discussion. Participants should bring a manuscript in progress.


Learning objectives

  1. Distinguish between ‘story’ and ‘study’ in your research writing

  2. Identify strategies for effective Introduction and Discussion sections

  3. Practice applying these strategies in actual writing (Participants should bring a manuscript in progress)


Who is this session for?

  • Academic writers and researchers in quality improvement and patient safety

  • Quality improvement and patient safety professionals looking to publish their work

Qualitative methods can be used in quality improvement projects to increase one’s understanding of the problem, the context in which one is aiming to make a change, and the impact of an intervention. In this session we will describe principles of commonly used qualitative research methods, such as interviews and observations, and provide examples of how they have been used in quality improvement projects. Participants will have the opportunity to plan how they can use qualitative methods in their own quality improvement projects.


Learning objectives

  1. Describe the role of qualitative research in quality improvement

  2. Describe fundamental principles of qualitative research methods

  3. Outline examples of the use of qualitative methods in QI projects

  4. Identify qualitative methods that can be applied in your own QI work


Who is this session for?

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Quality improvement and patient safety specialists

Hear from a panel of seasoned executive leaders as they reflect on their own experiences and lessons learned related to: How improvement work aligns with strategic goals; why building improvement capacity is an important leadership responsibility, and; how to support a culture of quality in your organization or system.


Learning objectives

  1. Consider how your improvement work aligns with the strategic goals of your system/organization

  2. Understand why building improvement capacity in others is an important leadership responsibility

  3. List strategies to build improvement capacity in your system/organization

  4. Describe actions that support a sustainable culture of quality in your system/organization


Who is this session for?

  • Health system leaders and executives (senior level)

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

Tired of hearing about PDSA cycles but not actually being sure what they look like in practice? This interactive session will use real examples from a quality improvement project for you to practise authentic PDSA application and better appreciate the benefits of doing so. By the end of the sessions, you will master the key steps in performing PDSA and be able to perform self-assessments regarding authenticity of your PDSA cycles.


Learning objectives

  1. Appreciate and describe the role of PDSA as an experimental study tool

  2. Take an iterative approach to learning, developing, and implementing change in your organization

  3. Perform self-assessments regarding authenticity of your PDSA work


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

Choosing Wisely Canada (CWC) is a national campaign that promotes the appropriate use of healthcare resources and avoiding unnecessary tests, treatments and procedures. This session provides an opportunity for clinicians and leaders implementing quality improvement initiatives that target CWC recommendations to come together and share their experiences in order to learn from experts and peers. Participants will gain an understanding of how the strategies, tools and resources available through CWC can be used to support their local implementation efforts.


Learning objectives

  1. Identify common challenges and barriers related to Choosing Wisely implementation

  2. Discuss strategies that can support local Choosing Wisely implementation efforts

  3. List examples of tools and resources available at Choosing Wisely Canada to support local implementation efforts


Who is this session for?

  • Health system leaders and executives

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

Partnering with patients on QI projects? Easier said than done. The commitment to include patients in the design of QI initiatives is growing in Ontario, but organizations, system leaders and health professionals are slow to engage for many reasons. This workshop examines the tensions and challenges organizations face and identifies strategies for overcoming them. You will develop skills needed to identify barriers when it comes to engaging leaders and staff, and practice tools for developing strong partnerships between organizations, colleagues and patients.


Learning objectives

  1. Identify barriers/challenges in partnering with patients on QI initiatives and develop strategies for overcoming them

  2. Practice tools for engaging with organizations, colleagues and patients to build full, effective, value-add QI relationships

  3. Become confident in enlisting support for partnering with patients, and preparing everyone to work effectively together on QI projects


Who is this session for?

  • Health system leaders and executives

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Patient and caregiver partners

Perhaps you’ve collected data for your QI work, but are struggling to understand how best to use it? Or you might be at the start of your QI journey, wondering what data you should collect? During this session, we'll discuss how the use and analysis of data in QI projects can help to efficiently communicate the impact of your changes to a variety of audiences. We’ll focus on the use of run charts and Statistical Process Control (SPC) charts, including how to construct and interpret them. We will discuss practical examples from previous IDEAS QI projects which demonstrate the effective use of data.


Learning objectives

  1. Describe the components of run charts and SPC charts

  2. Select the correct type of SPC chart for their data

  3. Interpret and run SPC charts to learn from data for quality improvement

  4. Identify opportunities to incorporate the use and display of data in their QI projects


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Students and those training for advanced quality improvement

The link between "Joy in Work", Quality Care and Patient Experience is increasingly being referenced in the literature along with growing rates of professional burnout. The term “joy in work” was first cited by W. Edwards Deming, the renowned scientist, quality expert and leader, whose management philosophy is globally recognized for achieving high performing and innovative organizations. He argued that when individuals felt connected to their work, when they could find meaning in their contributions the result was increased innovation and productivity. This interactive session will demonstrate the link between quality improvement and "joy in work" for participants to identify potential improvement projects aimed at improving joy in work.


Learning objectives

  1. Describe the implications of joy in work for quality care and patient experience

  2. Recognize the attributes that contribute to joy in work

  3. Identify strategies to increase joy in work


Who is this session for?

  • Health system leaders and executives

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Patient and caregiver partners

  • Students and those training for advanced quality improvement

The session will provide an opportunity to explore how taking a population-based approach to the design, delivery and evaluation of quality improvement programs can improve equity in patient experiences and outcomes. Using poverty as a case example, the session will focus on poverty’s impact on health care quality, including access and treatment outcomes, and how interventions such as screening tools can be used to identify patients in need of supports to ensure access to high-quality care and good health outcomes.

Finally, it will include discussions of how moving toward multi-disciplinary approaches and integrating social services and health care can improve health quality.


Learning objectives

  1. Describe how population-based approaches can help to improve heath equity, and the implications for quality improvement and planning

  2. Describe the impact of poverty on health and tools that can be used to help mitigate this impact and improve heath equity

  3. Understand the importance of accounting for social determinants of health when considering improvement work


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Health system leaders and executives


Tired of hearing about PDSA cycles but not actually being sure what they look like in practice? This interactive session will use real examples from a quality improvement project for you to practise authentic PDSA application and better appreciate the benefits of doing so. By the end of the sessions, you will master the key steps in performing PDSA and be able to perform self-assessments regarding authenticity of your PDSA cycles.


Learning objectives

  1. Appreciate and describe the role of PDSA as an experimental study tool

  2. Take an iterative approach to learning, developing, and implementing change in your organization

  3. Perform self-assessments regarding authenticity of your PDSA work


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

Pulling together teams and nurturing a culture of quality improvement can be one of the biggest challenges in leading quality improvement work.

This session is for health professionals at the frontline of care who oversee one or many quality improvement projects and are developing a culture of quality in their organization.

Participants will learn practical examples and strategies to address challenges from experienced organizational leaders who have championed quality improvement projects and a broader culture of quality in their organizations.


Learning objectives

  1. Understand how to engage your whole team in improvement and delegate effectively

  2. Analyze and improve the coordination of your organizations' improvement projects

  3. Describe actions that support a culture of quality in your organization


Who is this session for?

  • Health system leaders and executives

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Patient and caregiver partners

Personal resilience is critical in our fast-paced, complex and changing health care environment. No matter your role(s) in the healthcare system, the ability to effectively respond to challenges and change is a key competency. We need to nurture resiliency to both lead and provide high quality care. In this session, we will define resilience, look at situations that can threaten our resiliency and discuss ways to nurture this competency in ourselves and others.


Learning objectives

  1. Describe the role of personal resilience for leaders and clinicians

  2. Identify approaches to nurture personal resilience in ourselves and others


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

The link between "Joy in Work", Quality Care and Patient Experience is increasingly being referenced in the literature along with growing rates of professional burnout. The term “joy in work” was first cited by W. Edwards Deming, the renowned scientist, quality expert and leader, whose management philosophy is globally recognized for achieving high performing and innovative organizations. He argued that when individuals felt connected to their work, when they could find meaning in their contributions the result was increased innovation and productivity. This interactive session will demonstrate the link between quality improvement and "joy in work" for participants to identify potential improvement projects aimed at improving joy in work.


Learning objectives

  1. Describe the implications of joy in work for quality care and patient experience

  2. Recognize the attributes that contribute to joy in work

  3. Identify strategies to increase joy in work


Who is this session for?

  • Health system leaders and executives

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Patient and caregiver partners

  • Students and those training for advanced quality improvement

Effectively coaching individuals and teams to do QI work is frought with challenges. In this session, we will discuss and develop a list of common challenges to coaching QI work. An overview of coaching and feedback theories will be presented and then will be linked to the challenges experienced by the participants. Participants will leave this session with specific strategies to bring back to their institutions.


Learning objectives

  1. Identify common challenges QI supervisors face when coaching individuals and teams to do QI work

  2. Describe principles of effective coaching and apply them to overcome common QI supervision challenges

  3. Provide specific and actionable feedback to guide individuals and teams doing QI work


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Academic and researchers in quality improvement and patient safety

The breadth of field relevant to patient safety and quality improvement and the wide range of sources in which new research appears can make it difficult to keep abreast of important developments. This session presents important new research published in the past year on major topics in these fields. The presenters will address how the evidence-based QI and patient safety interventions and effective strategies identified in these papers can be translated into practice.


Learning objectives

  1. Decribe the body of evidence as it relates to specific interventions to improve quality and safety

  2. Recognize where the QI and patient safety movement is headed and the new issues that will emerge

  3. Identify new strategies that can be applied to your own practice


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Academic and researchers in quality improvement and patient safety

  • Students and those training for advanced quality improvement

Join a moderated poster walkabout of six “Top Abstracts”, selected from the poster abstract submissions. In groups of 10 people or fewer, hear about quality improvement and patient safety from the poster presenters themselves, and join in discussion.


Learning objectives

  1. Discuss current quality improvement and patient safety projects and findings

  2. Identify new quality improvement and patient safety initiatives that can be applied to one's own workplace settings


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement and patient safety specialists

  • Healthcare researchers

  • Front line service providers

  • Organizational leadership

Over the last few years there have been significant changes to the health system in Ontario, with a goal to making improvements across the spectrum of care.

This requires collaboration and joint goals for improvement among clinicians, providers, planners, and patients. It requires working across organizations and clinical groups to align efforts and improvements that support each other in providing quality care.

Many new leaders including clinicians have accepted this challenge.

This session will focus on case examples from Ontario, drawing on experiences from other jurisdictions, with an emphasis on how to inspire, support and influence improvement.


Learning objectives

  1. Identify common opportunities and challenges among clinical leaders involved in system focused improvement in Ontario

  2. Describe some of the key leadership attributes that will be particularly important for those in these roles. Exchange ideas with other leaders on strategies and tactics showing promise for successfully supporting change.

  3. Connect with other leaders holding similar roles to foster ongoing connection and sense of community among system leaders for quality


Who is this session for?

This session is designed for leaders supporting systems change and quality improvement – across health sectors and within LHIN regions including:

  • Health system leaders and executives

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Academic and researchers in quality improvement and patient safety

  • Students and those training for advanced quality improvement

This session will introduce participants to the Measurement and Monitoring of Safety (MMS) Framework, originally developed in the UK by patient safety expert Charles Vincent, and explore the Ontario experience with MMS at the frontline.

Three programs will share how they have implemented the framework:

  • Caring Safely at the University Health Network

  • In-patient mental health at Waypoint Centre for Mental Health Care

  • Sustaining MMS at the Family Birthing Centre at St. Joe’s Hospital

Finally, participants and presenters will discuss how senior leaders and board members could apply MMS to improve the patient safety conversations they are having.


Learning objectives

  1. Describe the 5 dimensions of the Measurement and Monitoring of Safety (MMS) Framework

  2. Explain how the MMS conceptual model can improve the safety culture in a healt hcare organization by engaging staff, patients and leaders in the safety conversation

  3. Describe how the MMS Framework can be applied in multiple healthcare setting.

  4. Identify an area in their healt hcare organization with a strong understanding of quality improvement principles for the implementation of the MMS conceptual framework


Who is this session for?

  • Quality improvement leaders and practitioners

  • Clinicians and health professionals

  • Health system leaders and executives and board members overseeing quality improvement

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